How to Draw a Geometric Butterfly

With bright colors, stunning designs, and unique patterns, drawing a butterfly is truly a joy for artists. Read on to discover just how to bring your geometric butterfly to life, and let your imagination take over.


Tutorial Video


Step-By-Step Images and Instructions

1.

How to draw a geometric butterfly step 1

Start with a black liner and use a ruler to draw three lines towards the bottom of your page. Use one central line, and make this the longest, then add two lines emerging from the bottom point, at around a 30-degree angle.


2.

How to draw a geometric butterfly step 2

Use the black liner and ruler to join the tops of the lines together.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 3

Use the black liner and ruler to create two small triangles directly above the shape you just created. These should be at roughly a 45-degree angle, with the tips of the triangles pointing down.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 4

Next, use the ruler to extend the original lines of the “V” upward slightly, then take a 45-degree angle, and extend the lines out on both sides.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 5

At the end of these lines, draw two further lines sloping inwards slightly.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 6

Next, add two more lines, this time heading downwards at 45-degree angle, from the top point of the original shape you drew. At the end of each of these lines, take another angle, and draw two more lines pointing towards the bottom corners of the pages on either side.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 7

Move towards the bottom point, and draw two more lines, once again, one on each side, downwards towards the bottom of the page, ending with two horizontal lines – one on each leg.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 8

Use the ruler to connect the lines together, creating wings.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 9

Use the black liner and ruler to draw a line in each wing, starting from the corner and moving inwards, to create triangles on the edge of each wing.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 10

Now, add more triangles by drawing another line from the point at which the wings meet, towards the top right-hand corner.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 11

Grab a red pen and add color to the top triangles of the wings, and the triangles at the top of the drawing.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 12

Then, use a blue pen for the triangles at the edges of the wings…


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 13

And pink for those on the inside at the top.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 14

Add a shade of red to the central body of the butterfly…


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 15

And a bright yellow to the triangles on the bottom wings, on the outside.


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 16

Then return to pink for the triangles at the very bottom…


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 17

Then, grab a green pen, and fill in the shapes besides the yellow triangles…


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How to draw a geometric butterfly step 18

Before adding a blue shade to the final section to complete the design.


Voila – your geometric butterfly has come to life before your very eyes – the next step is to start experimenting with different colors and combinations to create an array of vibrant, stunning insects to enjoy.

When it comes to butterfly types, the monarch is perhaps one of the most recognizable species, thanks to distinctive orange wings, bordered with white dots and black lines.

They are busy creatures with a strict migration schedule, moving from the United States and Canada to Mexico and California every winter, chasing the warmer rays of the sun. The species originated in North and South America but are now no longer found in the latter; instead, they breed west of the Rocky Mountains, and are also located in Spain, Portugal, Hawaii, Australia and New Zealand.

Monarchs are easily identified thanks to their bright, vibrant patterns, and this is deliberate – the colors are a warning to predators and potential enemies that the butterflies are poisonous, and that they will taste foul. If eaten, they tend to be toxic, and this is due to a key ingredient in their diet, milkweed.

Over time, monarch butterflies have evolved and developed to tolerate the toxic nature of the plant and can even go one step further – they are able to store the toxins within their body, without being harmed by it, but ensuring that the presence of the milkweed means that they are poisonous to predators such as birds and other animals. The bright, vibrant colors, then, are a key system for warning others about this – and this helps the insects to survive in the wild.

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