How to Draw an Airplane Engine

Let’s draw an airplane engine step by step. Tools needed: paper, gray pencil, drawing compass, black pen, gray pen.


Tutorial Video


Step-By-Step Images and Instructions

Play your part in aviation history, and let’s learn to draw an airplane engine.

1.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 1

Begin with a gray pencil and a drawing compass, and draw a medium-sized circle in the bottom left hand corner of your page.


2.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 2

Next, use the same tools to craft another circle, just outside the first, leaving you with a “ring” shape.


3.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 3

Using your compass, add a semicircle to the right hand side of the circle inside the ring.


4.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 4

Next, add another, smaller semicircle inside the one you just drew – this should be to the left hand side of this inner circle. Then, add another large, curved line to the right of this shape, curving gently around the right hand edge.


5.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 5

Now, add a small point to the semicircle at the edge of your inner loop, so that you have a small “teardrop” shape pointing out to the left. This should look a little like a bird with a beak pointing to the left. Then take an eraser, and gently remove the line within this teardrop, so that you have a clear, uninterrupted shape.


6.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 6

Now return to the ring you started with, and draw two parallel lines, one at the top and one at the bottom, heading out to the right, and curving slightly inwards as you reach the end, in an almost “cone like” shape, without the point. Connect the two lines together with a gentle curve.


7.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 7

Now, surround the “teardrop” shape with a series of long, thin shapes, almost triangular in nature. These should fan out around the central teardrop to the edge of the ring at the bottom – leave a slight gap at the top.


8.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 8

Switch to a black pen, and add a thicker line to the edges of the ring – leave a little empty space in the center. Use the same black pen to outline the edges of your engine – leave the “fan” in the center alone for the moment.


9.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 9

Use the black pen to add color to the top third of the “cone.”


10.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 10

Next, go over the “fan” shape with the same black pen, so that the outlines are strong and sharp.


11.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 11

Fill in the center of the “tear” shape with a solid black – leave a little white space around the very edges.


12.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 12

Grab a gray pen, and use this to fill in the rest of the “cone”, and the space between the top of the fan and the edge of the ring.


13.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 13

Use the same gray to fill in around half of the “fan” shapes, starting at the bottom.


14.

How to Draw an Airplane Engine step 14

Finally, return to the black pen, and use this to fill in the remainder of the fan shapes to complete your drawing.


Now that you have the skills to draw the engine, how about tacking the rest of the aircraft? The sky is the limit here!

Interesting Facts About Airplane Engines

There is no denying that the engine is one of the most critical aspects of any aircraft – this is the power behind the machine, and a functioning engine is crucial for both safety and success.

Sir Isaac Newton was the first to take credit for an engine of this type, when he used the third law of motion to theorize that a rearward channeled explosion may have the potential to propel a machine forward at a faster rate of speed – as the hot air blasted backwards, he proposed, the nozzle would move the plane or machine forward.

Later, Henri Gifford tested the theory, building an airship powered by an engine, but it was too heavy to fly – a face which was noted and adapted in the 19th century, when Felix de Temple created the first monoplane which could actually move.

The first gasoline engine came in the late 19th century, and the technology continued to grow and develop throughout the period. 1903 saw the first gas engine fly, courtesy of the Wright Brothers, and British pilot Frank Whittle patented the very first turbo jet engine in 1930 – from here, flight as we know it became truly possible.

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